July Wrap Up

The Stats:

PAGES READ IN JULY: 7323 pages across 23 books.

SO FAR IN 2020: 44,636 pages across 148 books.

My average July rating is 4.02/5!

July:

Between Starfalls by S. Kaeth: DNF @ 25% (excerpt here!)
When her son goes missing in the dangerous mountains, Kaemada is forced to break the sacred law and leave the path to find him, even if it throws her into fierce tensions building up to war.

To Sleep in a Sea of Stars by Christopher Paolini: ⭐⭐⭐⭐⭐ (review here)
When Kira uncovers an alien relic, she finds herself thrown into a world of first contact and alien civilisation that is going to change the course of human history forever.

The Deep by Rivers Solomon: ⭐⭐⭐⭐
Yetu holds the memories of her people, the intersex merfolk born from the pregnant African slave women thrown overboard, but they are becoming too much, and Yetu must decide whether to keep the memories or get rid of them altogether.

The Monster of Elendhaven by Jennifer Giesbrecht (3x): ⭐⭐⭐⭐⭐ (review here)
Elendhaven sits on the sea, haunted by a monster who cannot die and the frail master he dotes upon, and assists in his revenge plan against those who wronged their city, even if it costs them the world.

The Damned by Renee Ahdieh (sequel to The Beautiful): ⭐⭐⭐⭐ (review here)
In this sequel to The Beautiful, the consequences of Celine’s choice start to impact everyone around her, and difficult choices have to be made as secrets unfold.

Burn Our Bodies Down by Rory Power: ⭐⭐⭐⭐.5
When Margot meets the grandmother that she never knew, she also finds a dead girl wearing her face – has she found her home or was her mother keeping her away for a reason?

The Rules by Tracy Darnton: ⭐⭐.5 (review here)
The rules will keep Amber alive – if she can use them to stay away from the man who taught them to her, her prepper father who’s too ready for the end times.

Network Effect by Martha Wells: ⭐⭐⭐⭐
In Murderbot’s first full length novel, it’s time for a rescue mission and Drastic Action – even if they would rather be sat at home watching serials instead of saving their human associates.

The Mermaid, the Witch and the Sea by Maggie Tokuda-Hall: ⭐⭐⭐⭐ (review here)
Aboard the pirate ship Dove, Flora uses Florian as a defence against the crew but when Evelyn is brought on board as a passenger-turned-slave, Flora makes discoveries about herself that tie her ever closer to Evelyn and pull her further from the only life she’s ever known.

The Extraordinaries by TJ Klune: ⭐⭐⭐ (review here)
When Nick Bell meets his hero (and biggest crush, though he hates to admit it) he decides its time for him to join The Extraordinaries himself – now he just needs to somehow acquire superpowers outside his amazing fanfiction skills.

Home: Habitat, Range, Niche, Territory by Martha Wells: ⭐⭐⭐
A short, domestic story about Murderbot’s favourite human, Dr. Mensah, and the trouble she’s having after the events of the series so far.

The Black Kids by Christina Hammonds Reed: ⭐⭐⭐⭐
When the police officers who beat Rodney King half to death on camera are acquitted, Ashley Bennett is suddenly not just ‘one of the girls’ but ‘one of the Black kids’, and suddenly everything in her life looks different in the light of the riots.

All Systems Red by Martha Wells (2x):⭐⭐⭐.5
Murderbot is a Sec-Unit tasked with protecting a team of human scientists, even though he’d rather stay far, far away from them, but when their mission goes awry it’s up to Murderbot to stop streaming entertainment and keep them safe.

The Martian by Andy Weir: ⭐⭐⭐⭐⭐
Mark Watney was one of the first people to walk on Mars – and now he’ll be one of the first people to live alone on Mars after an accident means he was left behind as his colleagues evacuated – the survival game starts now.

Dagon by Ben Templesmith: ⭐⭐⭐
A graphic novel retelling of Dagon by HP Lovecraft.

Bonds of Brass by Emily Skrutskie: DNF @ 64% (review here)

The Year of the Witching by Alexis Henderson: ⭐⭐⭐⭐.5 (review here)
Immanuelle does her best to be a dutiful, diligent daughter and shake off the sins of her mother – until a mishap draws her into the Darkwood and a complicated, dark curse is triggered.

May Day by Josie Jaffrey: ⭐⭐⭐⭐
Jack is a detective and a Silver (you might call them vampires), but to solve this particular murder case, she’s going to have to do something more distasteful than any vampire legend – she’s going to have to team up with the man she blames for the disappearance of the love of her life.

Killian’s Dead by Josie Jaffrey: ⭐⭐⭐⭐
In this prequel to May Day, we get to see how Jack ended up a Silver, and how she first met the infamous Killian Drake.

Cinderella is Dead by Kalynn Bayron: ⭐⭐⭐⭐.5
The last thing that sixteen year old lesbian, Sophia, wants to do is get married off to a suitor she can’t choose, while the girl she loves is married off too, but when she flees the ball to Cinderella’s mausoleum, she sets in motion a chain of events that will change her life forever.

The Only Good Indians by Stephen Graham Jones: ⭐⭐⭐⭐
Ten years after a traumatic event, four American Indian friends are hunted by an entity from their past, left helpless as the consequences – and their traditions – catch up with them.

The Sin Eater by Megan Campisi: ⭐⭐⭐⭐.5
When May becomes a Sin Eater she thinks her life is over, until her newfound invisibility lets her uncover a dark plot within the palace walls, among even the Queen’s closest advisers and courtiers.

Wicked Saints by Emily A. Duncan: ⭐⭐⭐⭐.5
A girl who can talk to gods, a monstrous boy and a blood mage prince have one thing in common, a desire to kill the king.

Currently Reading:

Gideon the Ninth (x5) by Tamsyn Muir: ⭐⭐⭐⭐⭐ (review here)
Lesbian necromancers with enemies-to-lovers energy have to learn to trust each other during powerful trials on an unfamiliar planet.

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